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Weaver sawfly

Weaver sawfly

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2023-07-18 Snargl 0 minute 0 second

What is the animal Weaver sawfly known for?

The weaver sawfly is a type of insect that belongs to the order Hymenoptera, which includes bees, wasps, and ants.
The weaver sawfly is known for its unique behavior of weaving silk cocoons on the leaves of various plants, especially willows and poplars.

The weaver sawfly has four life stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.
The adult weaver sawfly is a small, black, and slender wasp with yellow markings on the abdomen.
The adult female has a saw-like ovipositor, which she uses to cut slits in the leaf veins and insert her eggs.
The eggs hatch in about a week and the larvae emerge.
The larvae are greenish-yellow with black spots and feed on the leaf tissue.
The larvae have silk glands in their mouths, which they use to produce silk threads.
The larvae use these threads to weave a protective cocoon around themselves on the leaf surface.
The cocoon is oval-shaped and has a slit on one end for the larva to breathe.

The larva remains inside the cocoon for about two weeks, during which it undergoes metamorphosis and becomes a pupa.
The pupa is dark brown and has the shape of an adult wasp.
The pupa breaks out of the cocoon and emerges as an adult weaver sawfly.
The adult weaver sawfly lives for about a month and mates with other adults.
The adult weaver sawfly does not feed, but only drinks nectar from flowers.

The weaver sawfly is not a serious pest of plants, but it may cause some defoliation and aesthetic damage.
The weaver sawfly has several natural enemies, such as birds, spiders, and predatory insects.
The weaver sawfly is also parasitized by other wasps, such as braconids and ichneumonids, which lay their eggs inside the weaver sawfly larvae or pupae.

The weaver sawfly is an interesting and harmless insect that can be observed in nature.

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Where does the Weaver sawfly live?

The Weaver sawfly is native to Europe, Asia and North America, where it is considered an invasive pest.
They are feed on plants often conifers.

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What does the Weaver sawfly look like?

The Weaver sawfly is a type of insect that belongs to the family Tenthredinidae, the largest and most diverse group of sawflies.
Sawflies are named after the saw-like ovipositor, the tube-like organ with which the female sawflies cut holes in plant tissue to deposit their eggs.
The Weaver sawfly has a black head, a yellow thorax with black markings, and a black abdomen with yellow bands.
The antennae are black and segmented.
The wings are transparent with dark veins and a smoky tip.
The larvae are green with black spots and feed on willow leaves.

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