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Lepidosauromorph

Lepidosauromorph

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2023-07-18 Snargl 0 minute 0 second

What is the animal Lepidosauromorph known for?

Lepidosauromorph is not the name of a specific animal, but a group of reptiles that includes all diapsids (reptiles with two openings in the skull) that are closer to lizards than to archosaurs (crocodiles and birds).
The only living subgroup of lepidosauromorphs is the lepidosaurs, which contains two subdivisions: squamates, which include lizards and snakes, and rhynchocephalians, the only living species of which is the tuatara.

Lepidosauromorphs are known for their primitive sprawling gait, which allows them to move their trunk and tail in a sinusoidal motion, similar to fish.
They also have a sliding joint between the coracoids and the sternum, which gives them a longer stride, and pleurodont teeth, which are attached to the inner side of the jaw bones.
In contrast, archosauromorphs have a more upright posture, a reduced or absent sternum, and thecodont teeth, which are set in sockets.
Lepidosauromorphs also have an ectothermic metabolism, which means they rely on external sources of heat to regulate their body temperature, unlike the ancestral condition in archosauromorphs.

Some of the extinct groups of lepidosauromorphs are the sauropterygians, which were marine reptiles that dominated the Mesozoic seas, and the kuehneosaurids, which were gliding reptiles with elongated ribs.
Lepidosauromorphs first appeared in the Early Triassic, about 252 million years ago, and diversified into many forms throughout the Mesozoic era.
However, most of the non-lepidosaurian lepidosauromorphs became extinct by the end of the Triassic or the Jurassic, leaving only the lepidosaurs as the sole survivors of this group.

Lepidosauromorphs are an important and diverse group of reptiles that have a long evolutionary history and show many adaptations to different environments and lifestyles.
They are also the closest living relatives of the archosauromorphs, which include some of the most successful and dominant vertebrates in the history of life, such as dinosaurs, pterosaurs, and birds.

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Where does the Lepidosauromorph live?

Lepidosauromorphs are a group of reptiles that include all diapsids closer to lizards than to archosaurs.
The only living subgroup of lepidosauromorphs is the Lepidosauria, which contains two subdivisions: Squamata, which includes lizards and snakes, and Rhynchocephalia, which includes only the tuatara.
Lepidosauromorphs live in various habitats around the world, depending on their subgroup and species.
Squamates are the most diverse and widespread group of lepidosauromorphs, occupying almost every continent and ecological niche.
They can be found in deserts, forests, grasslands, mountains, oceans, rivers, and even urban areas.
Some examples of squamates are iguanas, geckos, chameleons, monitors, skinks, cobras, pythons, vipers, and boas.
Rhynchocephalians are much more restricted in their distribution and diversity.
They are represented by only one living species, the tuatara, which is endemic to New Zealand.
Tuataras live on offshore islands and mainland sanctuaries.
They are nocturnal and burrowing animals, feeding on insects, worms, snails, lizards, and bird eggs.

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What does the Lepidosauromorph look like?

A lepidosauromorph is a type of reptile that is more closely related to lizards than to crocodiles or birds.

They have a sprawling gait, a sliding joint between the chest bones, and teeth that are attached to the inner side of the jaw.

Some examples of living lepidosauromorphs are lizards, snakes, and tuataras.

They have scaly skin, long tails, and usually four limbs (except for snakes).

Some extinct lepidosauromorphs include plesiosaurs, which had long necks and flippers, and kuehneosaurs, which had ribs that allowed them to glide.

Lepidosauromorphs are a diverse group of reptiles that share a common ancestry with lizards.

They have evolved various adaptations to different environments, such as aquatic, terrestrial, and aerial habitats.

Their bodies are covered with scales that protect them from dehydration and predators.

Lepidosauromorphs have flexible spines that enable them to move in a side-to-side motion, and a joint between the chest bones that allows them to extend their stride.

Their teeth are firmly attached to the inner side of the jaw, which helps them to grip and tear their prey.

Lepidosauromorphs are ectothermic, meaning they rely on external sources of heat to regulate their body temperature.

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